19th Century mower identification

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RichardHorrocks
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19th Century mower identification

Hi folks - new poster here.

I'm trying to identify the piece of equipment that the woman is pushing in the attached picture. I'm assuming it's a mower, but I've been unable to find a way to identify the type, and therefore confirm that it's not something else. The white box section at the front is the thing that's throwing me off. (I don't know what else it'd be if it's not a mower... )

Where the woman is standing where my house (and others) now stands. The year is (probably) after 1858 but before 1903. (In the larger picture this is cropped from there's a large house in the background that was dynamited in 1903.)

Any help on the identification would be much appreciated!

wristpin
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No sign of an image , just a

No sign of an image , just a " no entry" symbol !

RichardHorrocks
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Apologies - it was viewable

Apologies - it was viewable in my browser! I failed to read the instructions in the Forum Guidelines.

I've now updated. Sorry again.

wristpin
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Certainly one for the

Certainly one for the historians. It occurs to me that a lady of that era would not have been expected to use a lawnmower, so why the pose with one dressed in her Sunday best?  

The dimensions of the machine are such that it was unlikely to be able to deal with long grass yet it also appears to have been posed on the "lawn" with no sign that it has cut anything. The "grass box", if that's what it is, is of a strange shape but does look as though it may lift out.

 

 

hillsider
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Most definitely one for the

Most definitely one for the historians, as you say that white box up front is a mystery. 

Not so sure about the clothing being an issue as often it seems that folk got dressed up just for the photo as it was an important event back then, unlike something that we take for granted now.

Hopefully someone out in forum land will have some answers for us.

RichardHorrocks
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Thanks for the reply.

Thanks for the reply.

I agree, it's a bit of an odd photo. To give the context, the entire photo is below. It seems to be the women of the house, and perhaps a couple of friends, posing with various props. (A croquet set, a book, and what looks like a rake.) I'd like to think they were having a bit of fun, rather than it being anything serious.

The grass box is also what confused me. I haven't found pictures of anything else with a similar-shaped box.

(If it helps at all, the location is Enderby, Leicestershire.)

Mowing Wurzel
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It looks like a Barnard,

It is a:   Barnard, Bishop & Barnard    /   Barnard & Bishop      /    Barnard &Co.              Made in Norwich.

(Exact company name depending on date)

 

Perhaps one of their      "Patent Noiseless Lawnmowers."       "Cottage"    or     "Simplex" models.    

Despite the photograph  being the wrong side of the frame, We can just  see the drive-train casing protrusion, so could be a "Noiseless model."

 

Mowing Wurzel
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Here is a mention of Barnard

Here is a mention of Barnard & Bishop's 1864 Range of Lawn Mowers.

With the Internet it is so easy to find information.

Plenty of information and photo's concerning Messrs. Barnard & Co.'s Mowing Machines can be found on the Old Lawnmower Club website.

I have seen one "in the flesh" exhibited at The Old Lawnmower Club AGM at Milton Keynes. And a few have survived into preservation.

RichardHorrocks
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That's great - thank you very

That's great - thank you very much for the information. I'll get stuck into researching Barnard & Bishop's and follow up on what you've posted. I may have more questions once I've done this... smiley

Here's a slightly better close-up for those interested.

 

Mowing Wurzel
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The Gardeners Chronicle is a

The Gardeners Chronicle is a good reference point, this is how I recognized the machine. (if I'm right)

Are you now going to say that you have got this actual machine, if so many Lawnmower collectors will either be salivating or simply perspire from over excitement!

RichardHorrocks
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Thanks for the further

Thanks for the further pointer.

I'm afraid we don't have the actual machine, no. However, the land on which this house was built, and which quite a few other are now built, is still owned by the original old family estate. The head of the estate - an elderly aristocrat - recently died, and his widow has been left to put the estate in order. I know she'll be donating a lot of paperwork to the local heritage/history society, so if anything related to mowers comes up - perhaps an old mower from a barn/shed/outbuilding somewhere - I'll certainly let the forum know!