Drummond Willing Worker Handles

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Messorestore
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Drummond Willing Worker Handles

Hi, I wondered whether anyone could give me some advice please. I have a Drummond Willing Worker which needs new wooden handle grips. The spindles which hold the handles screw into the cast iron housing at the end of the main curved handles. Unfortunately I cannot unscrew the spindles to slip on the new wooden handles I have. As you can see from the photos the square spanner fixed head is at the extremity of the handle. I cannot move it with a spanner because the spindle is stuck so fast that the metal begins to spiral twist whilst stuck tight. I have sprayed with copious amounts of oil, unlocking fluid etc etc. I have heated the area with a blow torch to no avail. There is no opportunity to drill it out as the holder is open one end only. Does anyone have any ideas other than slitting the new wood grip along the length and glueing back together - not ideal. Thanks 

AlanY
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You might find "crack it" a

You might find "crack it" a freeze type release agent. Screw fix sell it. 
 

alanY

hortimech
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looking at it, I doubt if you

looking at it, I doubt if you will ever get it to unscrew. You may be able to get it out by heating the block cherry red and then attempting to turn the bolt with something like a pair of stilsons at the block end, but I doubt it. I think the easiest way will be to cut the bolt off, leaving a short stub, find a nut that is a push fit onto the stub and weld it on, this may then allow you to unscrew the remaining part of the bolt. If this doesn't cut off the nut and remain bolt flush with the block and then drill out the bolt, though the problem will be identifying the thread to get a new bolt.  

Messorestore
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Thanks , never heard of goat

Thanks , never heard of that before. I'll give it a go. 

Messorestore
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Thanks, I'll try the freeze

Thanks, I'll try the freeze method first, then give the weld idea a go. Both great ideas, thanks again

wristpin
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May save a bit of grief by

May save a bit of grief by cutting the mushroom head off. Grind the corners off the square, counter boring the end of your wooden handles about 3 to 4 mm. Slip the handles on , place a washer into the counter bore over the bolt stub and add a dab of weld to fix the washer to the stub end.

If your new handles a s bit slack on the wasted bolt shaft give it a good coat of epoxy filler or adhesive before pushing on the handle  - may be strong enough to hold the handles on without the washer and weld.

Messorestore
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Well I have to say that's

Well I have to say that's genius. Will indeed certainly save so much grief. I think you should patent that idea. I think it should be the go to answer. However modifying your idea slightly I've had a thought - would be to cut the spindle off three quarters up. Slip the wood handle on with epoxy then push the cut off bit into the end of the wood handle with epoxy. That way you still retain the original stub/ end cap at the end of the handle. The handle should have plenty of strength being three quarters fixed. 

wristpin
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Definitely a way of retaining

Definitely a way of retaining the original look and should be plenty strong enough for an “ exhibit “ , even if not for a worker.  I would, perhaps, cut the shaft a bit nearer to the square to retain as much support as possible and to make the counter bore in the handles the same size as a bit of dowel which could then be used as a pump to force the epoxy down around the shaft to fill any voids between shaft and handle. Then replace the original mushroom end. 

JSutherland
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A friend of mine now retired

A friend of mine now retired had the same problem but solved the issue by having a new handle made and bore holed, it was then cut in two halves and glued it back on to the lawnmower.

This may not be your first choice but it is an option.     

Messorestore
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All options considered. Still

All options considered. Still going to cut the spindle as suggested and then epoxy. This mower is going to be my nemesis. I have restored many mowers and several in a much worse state than this. It's very strange,  the Drummond looks great. Debating whether to repaint or just touch up here and there as not too bad. However every single component you try to take apart is welded together with rust in the threads, an absolute nightmare. Every step is like wading through glue ! Never had a mower needing so much time spent on it to achieve what are essentially little jobs. 

hdtrust
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There is only one correct way

There is only one correct way,and that is for heat,Oxyacetylene is the obvious answer,but equally as good is Oxypropane, and use a rose bud on the end,heat up with the handle in a vice,making sure the end you are heating is a couple of inches away from the jaws (otherwise the heat will go to the jaws and not the job in hand) that bolt will turn out of there easily,we do it all the time.

Another professional way is to freeze it with a drop of liquid nitrogen but must only be done with professionals

Regards

Andrew

The Hall & Duck Trust

wristpin
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There is only one correct way

There is only one correct way,and that is for heat,Oxyacetylene is the obvious answer,but equally as good is Oxypropane, and use a rose bud on the end,heat up with the handle in a vice,making sure the end you are heating is a couple of inches away from the jaws (otherwise the heat will go to the jaws and not the job in hand) that bolt will turn out of there easily,we do it all the time.

No argument with that but the standing costs of O/A cylinders and even a  HobbyWeld set up are difficult to justify even for the the most keen amateur restorer. Another issue is one of insurance . Normal home insurance won’t cover O/A and most insurers will not give cover for domestic premises if O/A is declared; if it’s not, and the worst should happen ...........

 

 

 

Adrian
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There's a very good reason

There's a very good reason for O/A not being covered, too. Should a cylinder be involved in a fire, even after it cools, the acetylene inside may well spontaneously decompose at the slightest provocation. Or, to use a technical term, explode. More than one firefighter has met a sticky, splattery end as a result.

wristpin
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Indeed, I was not going to

Indeed, I was not going to labour the point as the subject is probably of little interest to the average home restorer.  For the OP to say that there is only one way was less than helpful, but then he / they probably have an isolated workshop , have read the book and have flash back arrestors etc. We won’t ask whether their insurers and local fire service are aware of flammable gases being stored on the premises.

There is a safer alternative, an induction heater, not cheap and not quite as adaptable as O/A but safer and won’t give the authorities the habjabs.

https://www.hse.gov.uk/fireandexplosion/acetylene.htm

hdtrust
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Surely the answer is not to

Surely the answer is not to use any flame within the house! But down the garden shed / garage.Follow the rules and get know where,a good example,in every deed of house purchase it will say no business to be done within the property! Yet in these times the Government wish you to work from home.Its all about interpretation.

And before you say it I have to work with guide lines of HSE every day but sometimes wonder how much time they have on their hands

All the best

Andrew