Atco 14: Tips for removing exhaust stud

13 posts / 0 new
Last post
Darren - FAC
Offline
Last seen: 1 week 1 day ago
Joined: 09/06/2019 - 15:02
Atco 14: Tips for removing exhaust stud

Well, having got the Atco 14 going yesterday and feeling pleased with myself, today I fell into the trap of tinkering. I decided to clean up the exhaust silencer, as it's well rusted. Moderate pressure to remove the nut sheared the bolt on the exhaust stud. I can get a replacement stud, but I'm having no luck removing the rusted one. I've tried some Plus Gas, tried some gentle heat. Any advise? 

Many thanks,

Darren  

wristpin
wristpin's picture
Offline
Last seen: 6 hours 5 min ago
Joined: 23/05/2012 - 22:09
They can be a right pig so

They can be a right pig so consider.

File the end of the stud flat to remove all traces of the sheared bit. Drill and tap to take a 1/4 or 5/16 hex head screw (aka bolt) and secure the box with said bolt and a largish washer *. . New thick gaskets are readily available. 

*Metric hardware may also be used!!

https://www.japgmowers.co.uk/index.asp?function=SEARCH#/dfclassic/query=suffolk%20exhaust&query_name=match_and

Darren - FAC
Offline
Last seen: 1 week 1 day ago
Joined: 09/06/2019 - 15:02
Thanks Wristpin. I was

Thanks Wristpin. I was wondering if I might have to resort to something like that. Ideally, I'd like to remove it, so I'll try a little longer. I've made up some Weasel's Pee to see if that'll help. 

But, before I continue, I just want to clarify one thing. It is the fatter part of the stub that unscrews, where it enters the block, rather than the thinner part, isn't it? Just want to make sure that I'm trying to unscrew something that should unscrew!

I'm going at it with mole grips, as I cannot think of anything else to get on it, but they slip.  

 

wristpin
wristpin's picture
Offline
Last seen: 6 hours 5 min ago
Joined: 23/05/2012 - 22:09
Yes, the complete stub

Yes, the complete stub unscrews (or doesn’t!) from the block.  Removing the carb and using  a Stillson type self tightening pipe wrench may have more success than Mole or Vice grips. The stub has a tapered British Standard Pipe thread - hence its reluctance to move. 

In the worst cases , cut the stub off a little proud of the block and make a hacksaw cut longitudinally into it to the depth of the threads and then use a punch on the bit that you have left protruding to collapse it on itself . That usually breaks the bond between stub and block and allows it to be extracted.

A lot of faff - hence the suggestion to leave it in situ  and drill and tap.

 

 

Darren - FAC
Offline
Last seen: 1 week 1 day ago
Joined: 09/06/2019 - 15:02
As per your suggestion

As per your suggestion Wristpin, I delved into my rarely used tools box this morning in search of a self tightening pipe wrench. I was certain that I had one, and after a little while I located it. Must be 50 or 60 years old, a hand me down from my grandfather I think. 

Anyhow, I set to work with it, and in no time at all I'd removed the stud. Just goes to prove the golden rule ... get the right tool for the job. You're a genius Wristpin! Thank you. 

If that hadn't have worked, I was going to drill and tap as suggested. I'd even sent off for a set this morning. It gave me a good excuse to buy something I've wanted for a while. It could have been worse, I'd even started looking at one of those hellishly expensive heat inductor gadgets. I hate being beaten by rust and will go to almost any length to win the battle, but thankfully this time good sense and a poor bank balance saved me.

Now, I'm just waiting on a replacement stub to arrive, which I hope is the correct type. Before refitting the stub, I'd like to clean the thread in the exhaust outlet. Should I just use some petrol on a bit of rag for that? Also, when refitting, is it advisable to use some anti seize copper grease, or is that not a good idea?

Best wishes, 

Darren

 

wristpin
wristpin's picture
Offline
Last seen: 6 hours 5 min ago
Joined: 23/05/2012 - 22:09
Adapt your old stub for

Adapt your old stub for thread cleaning. Cut two double thickness hacksaw cuts at right angles to one another across the open end and screw it in and out several times . Cuts just need to be 1/4” deep. It will clear a lot of the gunge from the threads . A smear of anti seize on the threads of the new one won’t go amiss.

Darren - FAC
Offline
Last seen: 1 week 1 day ago
Joined: 09/06/2019 - 15:02
Good tip, thanks. Done now,

Good tip, thanks. Done now, so just waiting on replacement to fit. 

Chris G
Chris G's picture
Offline
Last seen: 6 days 22 hours ago
Joined: 22/08/2017 - 14:00
Is this type compatible? Its

Is this type compatible? Its off the later engines I guess so may be not but a lot easier to remove with the incorporated hex. 

wristpin
wristpin's picture
Offline
Last seen: 6 hours 5 min ago
Joined: 23/05/2012 - 22:09
Should be. Not sure but that

Should be. Not sure but that may be a pattern one.

Chris G
Chris G's picture
Offline
Last seen: 6 days 22 hours ago
Joined: 22/08/2017 - 14:00
I think they are OE Wrispin,

I think they are OE Wrispin, the four 114 motors I have dealt with had this type.

Darren you can have it for postage if you want to give it a shot

wristpin
wristpin's picture
Offline
Last seen: 6 hours 5 min ago
Joined: 23/05/2012 - 22:09
A bit modern for me! Don’t

A bit modern for me! Don’t think the 75 and 98 iron motors ever had the hex bit perhaps SIF decided that it would make life easier on the later lumps.

Darren - FAC
Offline
Last seen: 1 week 1 day ago
Joined: 09/06/2019 - 15:02
Hi Chris, 

Hi Chris, 

I didn't have the hex on the one that came off, so it's not quite the same, but nonetheless it's close and if you don't mind me having it, I'd be more than happy to send you the postage. Thanks Chris. 

Best wishes, Darren

 

Chris G
Chris G's picture
Offline
Last seen: 6 days 22 hours ago
Joined: 22/08/2017 - 14:00
Hi Darren, sorry I have been

Hi Darren, sorry I have been away.

PM me your address and I will pop it in the post if you still want it.

Cheers

Chris