Atco 14 Restoration

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Atco Andy
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Joined: 07/03/2018 - 20:02
Atco 14 Restoration

Hi all,

Before I begin I should mention that i am not very mechanically minded and i have never done anything like this before however, i find the idea of restoring this old mower quite exciting. Photo of the mower below.

I am going to undertake a full restoration of my Atco 14" 1948. I want to dismantle the mower, prep and spray paint and if possible undertake or provide some service to the engine so it will run as best it can and be something i enjoy using. 

Please can i ask the forum for some advice on what to buy and where to get it from. I have made a list below of things i think i need so if people from their experience can add this that would be great:

1. Green Atco paint - what shade of green should i use for the original colour, does any know or can advise on any particular paint type please? (any tips on spraying would be helpful too)

2. Red paint for the clutch - again as above

3. Outside of engine - this looks unpainted with a thin layer of rust over it and the cooling fins. i appreciate this gets quite hot so paint may come off here. is there anything i can do to protect this?

4. Metal handles - apart from removing paint from a previous touch up i would like to bring them back to their original shiny metal finish, do i need to treat these with anything?

5. Chains - These look a little complicated... I want take them off to spray the chassis, clean and refit. 

6. Engine - When i dismantle the mower i think this would be a good opportunity to provide some TLC to the engine - does anyone have any advise or a guide please?

7. Front rollers - shouldn't i have a wooden roller across the front? any idea where i can get one from as i cant find any on ebay etc..

Thanks,

Andy

wristpin
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Last seen: 29 min 41 sec ago
Joined: 23/05/2012 - 22:09
Welcome.

Welcome.

Some non specific advice. You don’t actually say whether it runs,but If not, I would forget about painting etc until you have it running, moving and cutting. The last thing you need is to expend time and cash doing a superb cosmetic refurbishment just to find that it has a mechanical problem which require a strip down with lots of finish destroying handling.

In particular get the engine sorted while still mounted in the frame - a ready made engine stand!  If the engine won’t fire up it may just need the points cleaning but if ( like many of that age) the coil windings are corroded and degraded there’s nothing for it but an expensive new coil. Beware of cheap “ new old stock” coils that may be as old as the original.

As far as dismantling and reassembling goes, plenty of  digital images are your friends.

 

Atco Andy
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Last seen: 3 weeks 3 days ago
Joined: 07/03/2018 - 20:02
Ok thanks - It has started up

Ok thanks - It has started up and runs i think. I started it up today but the engine kept cutting out. After some investigation it was apparent that there was a blockage in the fuel hose. I removed the fuel hose and cleared out the blockage from the valve between the fuel tank and the hose. I have just ordered a new fuel hose as the one that i removed had become brittle, cracked and broke as i removed it. 

How can i check the coil windings?

Thanks,

Andy

wristpin
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Last seen: 29 min 41 sec ago
Joined: 23/05/2012 - 22:09
If it's sparking and running

Coil.  If it's sparking and running - it's OK!

Should have said, there's a regular advertiser on that auction site who makes wooden rollers to order in a variety of timbers. I believe that Atcos of your age used a darkish oak. 

As you have already identified a fuel issue I would go back to the tank, make sure that it is free of debris and not likely to shed more, check the gauze filter on the tap inlet then drop the carburettor bowl and clean out any debris that has found its way there. Then with the new pipe fitted you can say "that bit is done". 

As you have a spark and it's a runner you can skip the magneto for now so as far as non-invasive engine work goes it only leaves the exhaust. Two strokes, by nature, tend to carbon up the cylinder exhaust port and the inside of the muffler. Remove the muffler and with the piston raised to prevent loose carbon falling into the cylinder, carefully scrape out any loose carbon that is reducing the diameter of the port. The textbooks will say "use a hardwood scraper" rather than an old screwdriver that may inadvertently score the piston. A suitably modified old wooden school ruler serves quite well. Most Atco/ Villiers mufflers have removable ends and the exhaust outlet pipe possibly extends inside as a perforated pipe  - clean all carbon etc from inside the cylindrical body and the pipe etc. Messy job!